Volume 4, Issue 1, January 2016, Page: 1-6
Clinical and Bacteriological Profile of Neonatal Sepsis in King Khaleed Civilian Hospital, Tabuk, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
Nagwa Gad Mohamed, Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Ministry of Higher Education, University of Tabuk, Tabuk, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
Shamina Begum, Department of Medical Microbiology Faculty of Medicine, Ministry of Higher Education, University of Tabuk, Tabuk, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
Mohamed Hamed El-Batanony, King Khaled Hospital, Ministry of Health Tabuk, Tabuk, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
Sawsan Mohammed Al Blewi, Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Ministry of Higher Education, University of Tabuk, Tabuk, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
Walaa Mahmood, Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Ministry of Higher Education, University of Tabuk, Tabuk, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
Mohammad Zubair, Department of Medical Microbiology Faculty of Medicine, Ministry of Higher Education, University of Tabuk, Tabuk, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
Received: Dec. 7, 2015;       Accepted: Dec. 21, 2015;       Published: Jan. 4, 2016
DOI: 10.11648/j.ejpm.20160401.11      View  4064      Downloads  154
Abstract
Neonatal sepsis is defined as a clinical syndrome of bacteremia with systemic signs and symptoms of infection in the first 28 days of life. Of newborns with early-onset sepsis, 85% present within 24 hours, 5% present at 24-48 hours, and a smaller percentage present within 48-72 hours. The present study included 38 septic neonates. They were divided into two groups: Group with early onset neonatal sepsis (29) and another group with late onset neonatal sepsis (9). The study group with early-onset sepsis showed 18 (62.1%) males, 11 (37.9%) females, mean gestational age (weeks) 34.28±4.7, mean body weight (gm) 2.1±0.8, mean Apgar score at 1 min. 6.7±1.8. 21 (72.4%) delivered by CS, 8 (27.6%) delivered by NVD. E. coli was the commonest organism identified in blood culture of septic neonates. Maternal anemia, PROM, and fever were significant risk factors for neonatal sepsis. Prematurity and low birth weights were among the most common neonatal risk factors. Respiratory manifestations were the commonest manifestations of neonatal sepsis in both groups. Treating maternal anemia during pregnancy will help to reduce the incidence of neonatal sepsis E. coli is still an important cause of early-onset neonatal sepsis. Blood cultures need to be done strictly before the start of the first dose of antibiotic.
Keywords
Neonatal Sepsis, Bacteriological Profile, Tabuk, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
To cite this article
Nagwa Gad Mohamed, Shamina Begum, Mohamed Hamed El-Batanony, Sawsan Mohammed Al Blewi, Walaa Mahmood, Mohammad Zubair, Clinical and Bacteriological Profile of Neonatal Sepsis in King Khaleed Civilian Hospital, Tabuk, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, European Journal of Preventive Medicine. Vol. 4, No. 1, 2016, pp. 1-6. doi: 10.11648/j.ejpm.20160401.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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