Volume 6, Issue 4, July 2018, Page: 53-57
Fruit and Vegetable, Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption among Kindergartners in Accra Metropolitan Area, Ghana: A Cross-Sectional Study
Perdita Hilary Lopes, Department of Epidemiology, Veterinary Services Directorate, Accra, Ghana; Department of Epidemiology and Disease Control, School of Public Health, University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana
Donne Kofi Ameme, Department of Epidemiology and Disease Control, School of Public Health, University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana; Department of Public Health Surveillance and Disease Control, Ministry of Health, Accra, Ghana
George Kuma Khumaloo, Department of Epidemiology and Disease Control, School of Public Health, University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana; Department of Public Health Surveillance and Disease Control, Ministry of Health, Accra, Ghana
Nana Afia Ntim, Department of Epidemiology and Disease Control, School of Public Health, University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana; Department of Virology, Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research, University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana
Rexford Adade, Department of Epidemiology and Disease Control, School of Public Health, University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana
Phoebe Balagumeyetime, Department of Epidemiology and Disease Control, School of Public Health, University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana; Department of Public Health Surveillance and Disease Control, Ministry of Health, Accra, Ghana
Evans Nsor Ayamdooh, Department of Epidemiology, Veterinary Services Directorate, Accra, Ghana; Department of Epidemiology and Disease Control, School of Public Health, University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana
Patrick Akandi, Department of Epidemiology, Veterinary Services Directorate, Accra, Ghana; Department of Epidemiology and Disease Control, School of Public Health, University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana
Maame Amo-Addae, Department of Epidemiology and Disease Control, School of Public Health, University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana; Department of Public Health Surveillance and Disease Control, Ministry of Health, Accra, Ghana
Received: Apr. 29, 2018;       Accepted: Sep. 5, 2018;       Published: Oct. 6, 2018
DOI: 10.11648/j.ejpm.20180604.13      View  297      Downloads  16
Abstract
Background: Fruit and vegetable consumption (F&VC) provide important nutrients and greatly reduces the risk of non-communicable diseases, especially when started from childhood. F&VC among adults in Ghana is one of the lowest worldwide, and this may also pertain to children. Since school children spend considerable time in school, what they eat during school hours is important for their development. The objective of this study was to assess F&VC and the proportion of sugar-sweetened beverage consumption (SSBC) among two socio-economic classes. Methods: A cross-sectional study of kindergartners in the Accra Metropolitan Area was carried out. Fruits, vegetables, sugar-sweetened beverages and two socio-economic classes were defined prior to the study. Six schools were randomly selected; two each from three sub-metros from the Accra-Metropolitan Area. Data on meals eaten by 422 kindergartners were collected through observation and interview, guided by a checklist. Means and percentages were calculated. F&VC and SSBC was assessed along the two socio-economic classes. Results: Feeding options at school were home-packed, school-provided, and meals sold by vendors. The mean age of the respondents was 4.1 years, with 49.1% (207/422) being male. The proportion of kindergartners who consumed school-provided and home-packed meals was 70.1% (296/422) and 64.5% (272/422) respectively. Only 2.2% (9/422) of kindergartners consumed fruits, whereas total vegetable consumption was 34.1% (144/422). SSBC was associated with socio-economic class (95% CI 0.28-0.62). Conclusions: F&VC was generally low in the study population. SSBC was high, especially, in kindergartners from the higher socio-economic class schools. The Ghana Education Service should promote their consumption, by making fruits and vegetables available in schools.
Keywords
Fruits, Vegetable, Sweetened Drink, Consumption, School Children, Ghana, Non-Communicable Diseases
To cite this article
Perdita Hilary Lopes, Donne Kofi Ameme, George Kuma Khumaloo, Nana Afia Ntim, Rexford Adade, Phoebe Balagumeyetime, Evans Nsor Ayamdooh, Patrick Akandi, Maame Amo-Addae, Fruit and Vegetable, Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption among Kindergartners in Accra Metropolitan Area, Ghana: A Cross-Sectional Study, European Journal of Preventive Medicine. Vol. 6, No. 4, 2018, pp. 53-57. doi: 10.11648/j.ejpm.20180604.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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