Volume 8, Issue 4, July 2020, Page: 48-55
Occupational Health and Safety: Provision of Appropriate Personal Protective Equipment (PPEs) for Mechanical Welding and Carpentry Workers in Mbala District of Zambia
Ebenezer Obi Daniel, Department of Public Health, School of Public Health, Texila American University, Georgetown, Guyana
Moses Mutyoka, Department of Public Health, School of Public Health, Texila American University, Georgetown, Guyana
Paul Olaiya Abiodun, Department of Public Health, School of Public Health, Texila American University, Georgetown, Guyana
Israel Olukayode Popoola, Department of Epidemiology and Community Health, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Ilorin, Ilorin, Nigeria
Kabir Yunusa Amari, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Arts, Benue State University, Makurdi, Nigeria
Ahmed Mamuda Bello, Department of Public Health, School of Public Health, Texila American University, Georgetown, Guyana
Oluwole Victor Oluwalomola, Department of Public Health, School of Public Health, Texila American University, Georgetown, Guyana
Christie Omolola Adams, Department of Public Health, School of Public Health, Texila American University, Georgetown, Guyana
Olayinka Victor Ojo, Department of Public Health, School of Public Health, Texila American University, Georgetown, Guyana
Received: Jul. 11, 2020;       Accepted: Jul. 30, 2020;       Published: Aug. 13, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.ejpm.20200804.13      View  121      Downloads  58
Abstract
Small-scale enterprises and the informal sector such as mechanical, welding and carpentry workshops constitute the fastest growing economic sectors and represent the most realistic form of employment creation. These occupations are vulnerable and prone to concern themselves with survival rather than improving health and safety and as such health risks remain high in their workplaces. The objectives of this study was to assess the provision of PPEs to employees and level of enforcement of Occupational Health and Safety Act of 2010 with other regulations, guidelines and standard operational procedures in mechanical, welding and carpentry workshops in Mbala District of Northern province in the Republic of Zambia. A descriptive survey of 75 employees from small scale industries or workshops was conducted and data was collected using a questionnaire in line with key ILO thematic areas for workplaces. The results showed that the employees in these workshops were generally not complying with requirements for provision of PPEs with 28% of employees reported not being provided with PPEs. Emergency preparedness and prevention in the workplaces was also poor as none of the employees reported being trained or inducted in first aid management and 0% had first aid kit at their workshop as only 8% were inducted. It was also revealed that employees in Mechanical, Welding and Carpentry workshops in Mbala District of Zambia mostly are not complying with the provisions of the Occupational Health and Safety Act 2010 on general provisions including regulation 22 on provision and use of PPEs leading to dangerous and highly risky workplace environment. It was further revealed that all the employees from workshops interviewed have never been inspected or audited by Factory Inspectors from the Ministry of Labor and Social Services or from any other authorized bodies leading to lack of legal enforcement. The findings of this study can be used to update the health and safety conditions at different workplaces, achieving many socio-economic benefits for Zambia. Intervention plans like education, awareness, and regular medical checkups should be advocated which help in prevention and minimizing workplace exposures to occupational hazards. The identification and prevention of work-related health costs could result in substantial savings for the national health system, leading to the more sustainable social system. This study provides the baseline for elaborative studies in the future.
Keywords
Occupational Health and Safety, Personal Protective Equipment, Prevention, Emergency Preparedness
To cite this article
Ebenezer Obi Daniel, Moses Mutyoka, Paul Olaiya Abiodun, Israel Olukayode Popoola, Kabir Yunusa Amari, Ahmed Mamuda Bello, Oluwole Victor Oluwalomola, Christie Omolola Adams, Olayinka Victor Ojo, Occupational Health and Safety: Provision of Appropriate Personal Protective Equipment (PPEs) for Mechanical Welding and Carpentry Workers in Mbala District of Zambia, European Journal of Preventive Medicine. Vol. 8, No. 4, 2020, pp. 48-55. doi: 10.11648/j.ejpm.20200804.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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